The Extraordinary Fellow From Down the Road

By J.F. McKenna

Being born on or near the Fourth of July is widely considered a good omen for any American. Making his July 4 exit from life’s stage was particularly fitting for Richard Mellon Scaife—Pittsburgh publisher, celebrated philanthropist and conservative philosopher. Scaife, who died one day after his 82nd birthday, was the extraordinary fellow from down the road, the citizen who meant it when he spoke of “limited government, individual rights and a strong defense.”

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, which Scaife acquired in 1969 and from which he charted the course of Trib Total Media, needed a special section of its Sunday edition to squeeze in the many tributes to the Ligonier, Pa., native. Ironically, the most-telling picture of the man came not from others but from one of his recent columns:

Even today, when so many kinds of media offer endless information, newspapers are unique and invaluable: They provide the most substantive, trustworthy reporting from the most experienced, reliable writers and editors;they consistently break more of the important stories, investigate more of the critical issues, and expose more of the secrets that we need to know. Newspapers, more than any other medium, keep a watchful eye on government at all levels, on business and technology, medicine and science, and other aspects of our lives.

Certainly sentiments one would expect from a spiritual descendant of our Founding Fathers. Not sentiments one would particularly expect from an heir to the redoubtable Mellon family fortune.

Like the nation itself, Scaife represents the exceptional case.

A shy person whose family name remains linked to Alcoa, banking and Gulf Oil, a Yale flunk-out who earned a degree in British history, a libertarian newspaperman who suffered no illusions that ours is a dangerous world, a generous citizen who saw value in encouraging the arts for this generation and future generations—that was Richard Scaife.

“By the time the 1950s ended, Mr. Scaife had also viewed and opposed a liberal shift taking place in the country, which included a stronger government role apparent in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations,” wrote the rival Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “He supported the ultra-conservative Mr. Goldwater’s failed presidential bid and the successful presidential campaigns afterward of Richard Nixon, to whom he gave $1 million in 1972. More relevant to his local roots, he spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in the 1990s to spur creation of the Allegheny Institute for Public Policy, which became a conservative voice on Western Pennsylvania issues long dominated by liberal or centrist Democrats.”

Likewise, Scaife was an original money-man behind the conservative Heritage Foundation. The foundation president’s Jim DeMint and founder Edwin Feulner described Scaife as a “man of vision as well as conviction,” adding:

“Dick Scaife was instrumental in creating a new breed of public policy institute in Washington that many deemed ‘‍risky,’‍ even ‘‍ill conceived.’ Dick’s steadfast support since 1973 allowed Heritage to become not only a permanent institution in Washington, but a permanent player in the public debate.”

Yet, as a savvy newsman, Scaife recognized the value of genuine content over mere labels. In its obituary of Scaife, the Post-Gazette noted that the philanthropist “was reported in 2010 to have become a six-figure contributor to the William J. Clinton Foundation, the ex-president’s charity to work on global improvements.”

Not long ago, Scaife announced publicly that he had untreatable cancer. Weeks later, the man with two deadlines was writing about the world’s future—from Pittsburgh to Prague and from Cleveland to Chengdu. One of his legacies was this warning to all.

“If we’ve learned anything in the Obama years, and with every president in my lifetime, it is that trying to appease our enemies does not succeed,” Scaife wrote. “Appeasement killed 60 million people in World War II;millions more have died or suffered terribly because of it in the decades since.

“I hope the next president we elect understands the threats…as resolutely as Ronald Reagan did. And I hope the next president realizes that appeasement—particularly of a nation like Russia or a leader like Putin—is one of the gravest threats of all.”

Rest in peace, extraordinary fellow from down the road.

 

J.F. McKenna, a longtime West Park resident, is a veteran business journalist and marketing-communications consultant. He is a former staff editor of such magazines as Industry Week and Northern Ohio Live. His online work also appears on the site Steinbeck Now. The Cleveland native and his wife, Carol, now live in Pittsburgh with their dogs, Duchess Holly and Lord Max. Reach him at jfmckwriter23@yahoo.com .

 

Last Competition

by Doug Magill

Edisto Beach lies south of Charleston, and has a reputation for being undeveloped and out-of-the-way.  The locals call the pace there, Edis-slow.  It was a perfect place for my two brothers, my sister and I to gather in late September to connect, spend time together and celebrate our now aging family.

Late in our week together my older brother Bob and I played golf on the Tom Jackson-designed Plantation Course on the island, and my younger brother Tom joined us – though he couldn’t play.  It was especially poignant, as Tom has been an avid – some might say obsessive – golfer since childhood.  He carried a 6 handicap for a while, and had a smooth and powerful swing.  He and I would compete intensely against each other every fall when we got together, just because we were brothers.

The Plantation Course is a lush and winding delight, with water hazards – it seemed – on every hole.  The Par 3 3rd at is a gently sloping 142-yard hole, with traps guarding the approach.  Tom asked if he could play this one hole with us, borrowing my rental clubs.  I outdrove him with a nice, arcing 8-iron that happily found the trap in front of the green.  Tom’s swing was awkward, creaky and bouncy, but his ball made it out about 120 yards.

Tom was thin, pale, and had an old man’s gait, due to the rod in his leg from the cancer that had caused part of his femur to be taken.  His hip hurt, he had trouble breathing due to the cancer in his chest and he had scars from chest surgery.  He also recently had surgery on his jaw due to calcification from the radiation treatments for his neck cancer.  His swing was a shadow of what it once was, but he was still in the fairway.

My second shot didn’t clear the trap, and Tom’s looked like one of his normal chip shots onto the green.  His short game was always better than mine, as he had learned long ago that chipping and putting saved his game –  and he worked at it.  When we competed I usually won, as I found that negotiating strokes beat technical skill any day, and Tom would be overconfident and lose angrily.  There’s nothing else like competition between brothers.  But, in the last few years that changed, as he learned to negotiate to how I played and began winning more often.

Three years prior Tom was diagnosed simultaneously with neck and kidney cancer.  His kidney was removed immediately, and he began radiation and chemotherapy for his neck cancer.  It was horrific, and left him weakened, scarred, and without taste or salivary glands.  He endured, with grace and humility.  And, he never complained, or felt sorry for himself.  He later developed jaw problems that required multiple surgeries which left him unable to open his mouth very well.

I finally found the green and two-putted.  My little brother had two putts as well.  His grin was pure Tom, and for that moment there was joy, and we were brothers just playing golf.  And as he laughed he said, “You know, Doug, if this thing gets me you’ll be the youngest, but I’ll always be the favorite.”  And so it is.

Tom died a week later due to complications from the kidney cancer that had invaded his lungs.  Now, the final scorecard reads, Tom 4, Doug 5, in our last competition.  So, for the rest of my life there will be no rematch, but every game of golf I will play from now on I will see Tom’s grin at besting me once more.  Wherever he plays now, may his swing be supple and true, the fairways long, the rough high, the sand fine and the greens fast.  Requiescat in Pace, Tommy.

Tom- Edisto

Tom Magill left a wife and three children and joyful memories. Doug Magill is a communications consultant, writer, and voice-over talent.  He can be reached at doug@magillmedia.net

Of Duty and the Well of Fortitude on the Fourth of July

By Doug Magill

On a moonless Pacific night during World War II, the pilot of a Hellcat fighter returning from a routine patrol desperately searched for the comfort of an aircraft carrier he would never find. My father, directing fighter operations on the ship that was the home of the lost plane, listened in horror to the static-roughened panic in the young man’s voice. His radio direction-finding equipment had failed and fleet orders prevented the carrier crew from illuminating the ship due to nearby Japanese submarines.

Disappearing into the blackness of the sea, terrified and alone, the pilot was not considered a coward by his shipmates. My father first told me this story when I was young, and I asked him how a brave military pilot could panic. With a soft and faraway look in his eyes, he replied, “It’s just that his well of fortitude ran dry. We all never knew how deep it really was for any of us.”

Eddie Rickenbacker, the World War I combat pilot once said, “There can be no courage unless you’re scared.” He understood that there is a well of fortitude within that can be drawn upon time and again, under even the most terrifying circumstances.  And yet, military men know that there are occasions when even that is not enough, when fear can overcome even the hardiest soul, when there is no more bravery, no more strength, no more belief. Still they are drawn beyond what can be humanly expected by their sense of duty – to themselves, to their comrades, to their country.

During the war my father was aboard a jeep carrier, the USS Cowpens, which was attacked by kamikaze aircraft, and barely survived the monstrous waves of Halsey’s typhoon (Typhoon Cobra), a ferocious cyclone in the Pacific Ocean that struck the Pacific Fleet with one-hundred twenty mph winds and sank three ships.

Cowpens

USS Cowpens (CVL-25) during Typhoon Cobra
18 December 1944

The Cowpens was also sent as a decoy into the Sea of Japan without escorts.  When I asked Dad if he was scared, he would only say that he was able to draw from his well of fortitude during those times, and hang on. At times he was so frightened that he couldn’t move, but when he saw his shipmates doing their duty he felt he had to do his job and not let them down. He never boasted or showed pride, only relief that he had performed his duty and not failed his shipmates.

Landing on the beaches of Okinawa with the 1st Marine Division, my uncle Tom suffered from migraine headaches which prevented him from seeing. All he could do was hang onto the web belt of the man in front of him. His comrades would tell him where to aim so that he could shoot. Though he didn’t share many details of that bloody island, he told me of times when he was so afraid he couldn’t move, or shoot, and that the chaos of war gave countless opportunities for heroism and panic, often to the same person in the space of moments. He described the jungle and the insects, the heat, and the constant fear. He told me, “I was afraid all the time, and felt suffocated because there was nowhere to hide. It was a relief sometimes to dig leeches out of my legs with my combat knife. The pain was real, and distracted me from the fear.” He drew deeply from his well of fortitude, time and again shaking and panicked. Wanting to do his duty for the men around him he would take that next, halting step which kept him going for one more minute, one more agonizing hour, one more terrifying day.

Proud of their service, both my father and my uncle never described themselves as heroic or deserving of special consideration. They knew that brave men could panic, and cowards could become unexpected heroes. Incredible feats of courage were often not recognized and medals were awarded for trivial things, or for momentary political purposes.

To most veterans, medals and awards are not indicative of the value of one’s service, and do not imply a hierarchy of bravery. They do not judge the value of one’s duty, as they know that even clerks in Washington are important, as are the bases and supply ships manned by tired and overworked sailors and airmen – who will never be recognized. They, too, perform their duty and may have had to draw upon their wells of fortitude due to accidents, weather, or other events that required bravery unrelated to combat.

A childhood friend of mine declined a Bronze Star during his service in Vietnam because his sense of honor caused him to feel that others deserved it more. Dan felt it would have been false pride to accept a decoration that he didn’t feel he deserved, though he knew he had performed his duty and saw combat that tested him.

Most veterans understand that medals aren’t scorecards for manliness. Performing their duty was all that mattered. The rest was randomness and fate.  A man performed his duty when required, regardless of acknowledgement or reward, and without complaint. The concept of duty is something that these warriors passed on to their children.  I have many childhood memories of completing required tasks, hoping in vain for recognition from my father. Acting responsibly was not worthy of note.

Most military men would react with disdain to a leader who attempted to take credit for the actions of men at arms when all he did was to make a politically-calculated decision to send them in harm’s way.  Particularly after requiring the overall commander of the operation to sign a document that would place blame on him should the operation fail.

A leader takes responsibility first, and credit last.

Military men know that courage is what is shown, not claimed.  And, that duty is what takes them beyond courage.

To shiver for days on end while being underfed and improperly clothed, waiting as your comrades slink away, knowing that you will soon be asked again to fight a professional enemy vastly better equipped and trained than you are.

To walk in ramrod-straight pride up a hill in sweltering July heat knowing that those you are attacking are entrenched and will soon devastate your comrades in a hail of grapeshot and gunfire.

To endure endless days and nights of rain and snow while your ship becomes coated with ice and knowing that a relentless foe is marshalling submarines and aircraft to send the ships you are bound to protect to searing moments of hell followed by the iciness of the depths.

To be starving and shivering in the relentless snow, surrounded by arrogant troops believing they will crush your dwindling forces as you run out of ammunition, and finding those last moments of pride when your leader responded to a request for your surrender with a single word, “Nuts!”

To be asked that one last measure of energy and strength to defend a wind-blasted hilltop in cold so deep your weapons have frozen and your arms are so heavy it is a burden to place your bayonet on your rifle to repulse one more charge of a fanatical foe.

To find the heat of the jungle dissipate and the sweat on your body chill as you crawl into a tunnel pursuing a mind-numbed enemy who plants traps to maim you and hides behind children and executes women as an example and who will never stand and fight directly.

To step carefully through the blasted remains of buildings knowing that a relentless foe wishes to take your legs or arms without ever having to fight you as you search through the stench and the garbage in deadening heat for men for whom cowardice is a moral code.

And yes, to feel the vibrations of the helicopter engine in your back as you prepare to leap into the night of a foreign country where you don’t know the strength of your enemy and the deviousness of his waiting traps.

Because your country needs you to.

Because you have been ordered to.

Because your comrades depend on you.

Because in all, it needs to be done.

These are the men who have found the meaning of courage, and duty.  Not those who issue commands and boast in comfort and security behind the protection that they and their comrades provide every day.

These are the men we remember today.

As the young Hellcat pilot found in his last moments before entering the silent embrace of the sea, duty doesn’t always involve the risks of combat. His service and death were nonetheless noble and honorable. Military men will forever salute him because of that. Today, it would be fitting for those who profess to lead us, and for those who evaluate them, to humbly remember all of those who have died nobly, regardless of circumstances. They owe the opportunity to do such things in a democracy to those who performed their duty for all of us, even if their well of fortitude ran dry in darkness and solitude, far from home.

 

Doug Magill is a communications consultant, freelance writer and voice-over talent.  He can be reached at doug@magillmedia.net

Things Not Otherwise Noted: June Edition

By Doug Magill

The response of anybody interested in liberty is that we all have a say and the ability to have an argument is exactly what liberty is, even though it may never be resolved. In any authoritarian society the possessor of power dictates, and if you try and step outside he will come after you.

Salman Rushdie

 

Lost in all of the crocodile wailing about the Hobby Lobby decision was a case of greater import to our nation in Harris vs. Quinn.  Pamela Harris was an Illinois homemaker caring for her developmentally disabled son.  Because the state Medicaid program valued home care as a way to save money, she received partial funding through that state’s program.  As is typical in the public sector union racket, Illinois gave the SEIU the ability to organize home care workers.  Their interest was simply that home care workers didn’t need much attention from the union, but their coerced dues could be used to help them support more Democrat candidates.  The iron oligarchy of the union-Democrat alliance.

But Pam Harris didn’t feel she needed a union to bargain for her as she only cared about taking care of her son, and who was she going to bargain with anyway?  Still, the SEIU persisted but they happened to push the wrong woman a little too hard on this issue.  She sued all the way to the Supreme Court and won.  Not only does she not have to be coerced into paying dues to a union that would do little for her, neither will any of the other home care workers in Illinois, most of whom are individuals taking care of their own disabled children.

This scenario played out on a state level in Michigan recently as well.  Democrat Governor Jennifer Granholm gave the SEIU a gift in 2005 by enabling the union to organize that state’s home care workers.  Most of them were also individuals caring for disabled family members, but by reclassifying them as public sector workers because they received Medicaid funds then they could be forced to pay 2.75% of their Medicaid reimbursements to a union that would do nothing to support them.  It was simply a dues grab by the SEIU.

Correcting the problem the Michigan legislature passed a law in 2012 that changed the classification of home care workers declaring that they were not, in fact, public sector workers.  In a very short period of time, the number of members of the healthcare union fell by 80%.  Unfortunately, the union managed to coerce over $34 million from those dedicated souls in the interim.

Wisconsin’s Act 10, which was passed in 2010,  has had a similar affect as that state has drops of over 80% in the membership of many public sector unions.   Unions rely on the coercive power of the state to enable them to extort dues which they use for political purposes.  Most union members do not approve of this, and in the next few years we will see additional challenges to forced unionization.  The results will bring much-needed balance not only to our labor markets, but to our politics as well.

 

What we are now seeing in challenges to coerced unionization is being writ large with respect to corporations.  Unions, taxes and regulations are destroying the ability of many companies to compete domestically and internationally.  Having had enough of California’s corrosive atmosphere towards enterprise, Toyota is moving its headquarters to Texas.  Not only will that affect the economy of the state, it changes the image of California as being the best place to live and develop products.  Despite its politically correct investment and support of green-darling Tesla, Toyota grew tired being used as a convenient scapegoat for local political issues and losing money on mandated vehicles that are neither truly efficient nor profitable.

Toyota Leaves California for Texas

 

Pratt & Whitney is a venerable name in aviation.  Thousands of U.S. aircraft were powered by their engines during World War II, and they have continued to burnish that already-bright reputation.  Unfortunately, they too have decided that California is hostile to business and have announced that one of their subdivisions will be heading to more encouraging locales:

Pratt & Whitney Subsidiary to Leave California

 

Once upon a time we were promised changes to health insurance that included the ability to keep our current insurance, pay less, keep our doctors and decrease the national debt.  All of which have now been revealed as lies.  In a dialectic pretzel that would make Pravda proud, the New York Times claims that we have to “break people away from the choice habit.”  Who’d have known?  The ability to make individual decisions is a destructive habit.

Getting Rid of that Pesky Choice Habit

 

When even the liberal coastal media begins to question the competency of the President and his staff as disaster after disaster rolls across the Potomac, the country begins to wonder just who is occupying the highest office in the land?  It has been well known that Obama doesn’t have much of a work ethic, but unfortunately he has hired a number of people not only of little experience but little education as well.  And certainly little knowledge of how the country works.  There are no staff members with entrepreneurial experience, not military backgrounds, no agricultural work and probably no non-Ivy league perspectives.  Except for the revolving door for Wall Street executives (ever practical they had no problem being captured by Democrats), this may be the most insular and immature group of people ever assembled to run a country in recorded history.  Jonathan Alter, author of The Center Holds: Obama and his Enemies, recalls a conversation with an accomplished CEO where he complained “when we go to the White House, we talk to people we wouldn’t hire.”  Indeed.

The Frat House on Pennsylvania Avenue

 

Thomas Piketty has become the new darling of the pseudo-intellectual left.  His book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century comes to conclusions already meeting the perspective of the redistributionist vultures.  Presenting data that seems to meet their theme that capital drives inequality and rapacious taxation levels are required to correct these grievous wrongs, he is getting glowing reviews from the liberal press not seen since Hillary Clinton’s first book (or second? or was it an article?  one loses track).   The problem is, like most studies that purport to support liberal fantasies, he couldn’t quite make the data match his conclusions so he either makes it up or modifies it.  He has a future with the global warming crowd.

Financial Times Exposes Piketty’s Data Manipulations

 

It should never be underestimated how creative Americans can be.  Once we begin to lift the burden and uncertainty of a bloated and misguided government, our economy should boom.  In the meantime, enjoy viewing what one enterprising but lazy dog owner has invented.

Building a Better Dog Exercise Machine

 

Doug Magill is a communications consultant, freelance writer and voice-over talent.  He can be reached at doug@magillmedia.net

 

The Lerner Phenomenon

By J.F. McKenna

Just in time for Independence Day 2014, Uncle Sam blazes a trail in the forest of bureaucratic apologia, a new and improved version of “The dog ate my homework, teacher.” Like most federal concoctions, this one is wildly egregious as well as potentially expansive, asking the citizen to swallow whole the equivalent of “The dog ate my homework, and then a bear ate my dog.”

And there’s no better site to perfect such a stress test on facts than the Internal Revenue Service, whose unofficial motto is borrowed from that master stretcher-teller Mark Twain, who once declared, “Never tell the truth to people who are not worthy of it.”

Twain, of course, was making a satirical point when he first uttered that bon mot. The IRS & Co.—in particular, former tax-lady Lois Lerner—is in dead earnest about official prevarication.

Allow me to quickly recap several earlier acts of the comic opera I’m From the Government and I’m Here to Help. The IRS has been hip-deep in controversy over disputes about its scrutiny of political groups, especially tax-exempt organizations not in full concord with the current administration.

As the journalistically redoubtable Wall Street Journal recently summarized, “The former IRS Director of Exempt Organizations was at the center of the IRS targeting of conservative groups and still won’t testify before Congress.” OK, to be fair, let’s hear it for that constitutionally enshrined right against self-incrimination. Score one for civil liberties.

At the same time, though, consider Lerner’s overall rights-for-me-but-not-for-thee record, again as laid out by the WSJ in a recent lead editorial: As an IRS director, Lerner “shipped a database of 12,000 nonprofit tax returns to the FBI, the investigating agency for [the Department of] Justice’s Criminal Division. The IRS, in other words, was inviting Justice to engage in a fishing expedition, and inviting people not even not even licensed to fish in that pond.”

Obviously, emails between Uncle Sam’s agencies can fill in many a bureaucratic blank about this situation. Yet, as the Journal wrote, a year had passed before the IRS could locate Madame Lerner’s high-tech missives, which by then had attracted the scrutiny of a House Oversight Committee.

“The Oversight Committee had to subpoena Justice to obtain them, and it only knew to do that after it was tipped to the correspondence by discoveries from the judicial watchdog group Judicial Watch,” the newspaper reported. “Justice continues to drag its feet in offering up witnesses and documents. And now we have two years of emails that have simply vanished into the government ether.”

That’s right—confidential digital documents gone, followed by the announcement that other IRS offcials’ emails had vanished, followed by The White House’s saying that it had “found zero emails” related to Lerner, followed by the latest announcement that the former IRS official’s hard drive had been recycled. (Oh yeah, just for good measure, add in the latest discovery that the IRS cancelled its email-server contract after the reported crash three years ago.)

To borrow one more line from the WSJ, “Never underestimate government incompetence, but how convenient.” The only other dramatic touch this tale lacks is a voiceover from The Twilight Zone host Rod Serling—“For your consideration….”

Speaking of consideration, where does the tax-paying citizen factor into The Lerner Phenomenon, other than picking up the tab for the damages? And the damages will prove to be profound, especially in terms of the open exercise of individual rights.

As noted at the top, this Beltway farce unfolds even as we get ready to celebrate the nation’s independence. It might be worthwhile to re-examine two of the indictments the authors of our Declaration of Independence leveled against England’s king in 1776:

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people and eat out their substance. He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation.

Generations later, good old Mr. Twain improved on the Founding Fathers’ lyrics but kept the general tone of public dissatisfaction—and certainly anticipated our current dilemma as framed by The Lerner Phenomenon: “The mania for giving the Government power to meddle with the private affairs of cities or citizens is likely to cause endless trouble.”

And that, most definitely, is the unvarnished truth.

 

J.F. McKenna, a longtime West Park resident, is a veteran business journalist and marketing-communications consultant. He is a former staff editor of such magazines as Industry Week and Northern Ohio Live. His online work also appears on the site Steinbeck Now. The Cleveland native and his wife, Carol, now live in Pittsburgh with their dogs, Duchess Holly and Lord Max. Reach him at jfmckwriter23@yahoo.com

The Consequences of Honor

By Doug Magill

 

The most tragic thing in the world is a man of genius who is not a man of honor.  George Bernard Shaw

It is one of the dismaying things about our President and his minions: their inability to understand the deeper meaning of things.  They use words to win, not to explain; images to demonize, not to elevate; power to bully, but not to protect.

Yet it all fits with the image of those raised after the World War that defined our country.  Everything is exigencies and now.  Self-aggrandizement as an art and a life goal at the expense of character and probity.

One must weep for those fallen in our name to have their sacrifice conflated with someone like Bowe Bergdahl by a thoroughly dishonest academic like Susan Rice, who commented about Bergdahl’s enlistment qualifying him for having served with “honor and distinction”.  Those who have served know honor is earned, not a decision that may lead to an opportunity for honor.  There is an understanding of this even in pop culture, as this quote attributed to Midori Koto clarifies “Honor isn’t about making the right choices.  It’s about dealing with the consequences.”

No one in this administration understands the consequences of policies, the effects of dishonesty, the obligations of failure or the acceptance of responsibility.

Honor is a recognition of service, of integrity, of duty.  Concepts that do not have a place in the list of virtues desired by this administration.  American military personnel have known since the founding of this country that sacrifice is an essential part of service, and that the result may be death.  But they have willingly taken that journey because of the idea that this country represents, and its uniqueness in the history of the world.

My father and uncle served in combat in the Pacific in World War II, and they understood honor.  It was earned, even by those that served in roles that did not involve combat.  They did their job and helped secure victory.  Even those whose well of fortitude might have run dry in the screaming hell of combat are remembered with honor.  They were there, they did their job, and if they fell, overwhelmed, their sacrifice is something greater than anyone serving this administration will ever know.

Honor could never be about nominating oneself for medals as the bumbling narcissist John Kerry did before disappearing from duty and viciously attacking those who had served with him.  It could never be about the solipsistic demand for recognition obtained by others and the fanatical washing of hands relative to consequences never acknowledged like Hillary Clinton.   It could never be about awards given for political purposes rather than accomplishments, as when our preening President received a Nobel Peace Prize.  And it will never be about burying distasteful things in the weekend news cycle or imposing mandates that were never understood or accepted by the country.

It is for those who know honor to rebuild and renew this country, and protect it from the consequences of the Obama years of illusion.  It is for us to make sure that happens.

 

Doug Magill is a communications consultant, freelance writer and voice over talent.  He can be reached at doug@magillmedia.net

 

Things Not Otherwise Noted: May Edition

By Doug Magill

There was a time when going to the airport was interesting, and farewells could be extended.  The massive bureaucratic overreach of the TSA has certainly put the fun in dysfunction and made traveling a chore.  But, the TSA was never about safety, it was another means to spend money on a government entity that could be unionized and lashed to Democrat bloat:

End the TSA

 

While Harry Reid wails at the Koch brothers, a very influential shadow group, the Democracy Alliance, finds ways to funnel millions to left wing groups and candidates to disguise their sources.  It is clear that labor unions and wealthy liberals want influence, they just don’t want it to be known.  And this doesn’t even include Tom Steyer who has broken the brazenness bank with $100 million for Democrats.

Confidential Documents at the Democracy Alliance Donor Conference

 

As global warming has morphed into global climate change, the power politics behind the increasingly shrill warnings and proclamations never discusses with probity the reality of what this massive wealth and control redistribution plan really means.

Sacrificing Africa for Climate Change

 

Even knowing that cap and trade and other socialistic schemes will have a destructive influence on the economy and society, government regulations already cause huge problems.

Regulations Take a $1.8 Trillion Bite Out of the Economy
The reality of Hollywood liberal hypocrisy is pretty much well known to all sentient beings in this country.  Still, it is especially disheartening when the depths of that dishonesty is revealed when money matters more than our country, or its energy independence.

Project Veritas Records Hollywood Liberals Willing to Sacrifice America

 

Speaking of Sharia, there are a number of other projects that should be revealed are financed by practitioners of that medieval and horrific code.

Other Hollywood Projects That Support Sharia

 

Our ever-gloomy president recently unveiled another in a long line of political attempts to find a way to make your money no longer something you’re entitled to use.  The third annual National Climate Assessment is the usual cut-and-paste collection of anecdotes and hysterical proclamations.  Problem is, it’s getting less and less believable.

Other Scientists Call White House Report Pseudoscience

Himalayan Glaciers Not Disappearing

Over 31,000 Scientists Claim Climate Change is Unsettled Science

Worried About Rising Sea Levels?  Do the Math

Antarctic Climate Change?  Well, Not So Much

Prominent Scientists Issue Pointed Rebuttal to White House Climate Claims

 

For the pollyannas who chant “solar energy, wind turbines” at mentions of climate change it should be mentioned that no one has, to date, come up with an economic case for wind turbines that makes any sense without massive government subsidies.

Why Wind Energy is Another Crony Capitalist Enterprise

 

Micahel Mann has now entered the ranks of the infamous with his “Hockey-Stick” graph of global warming based on data manipulation and logical leaps that Evel Knievel wouldn’t have attempted.  Still, when called out on his egregious errors and lack of honesty he thinks the American judicial system can help him where science cannot.  His attempts at recent lawsuits are another example of doubling down on dishonesty.

Michael Mann is a Liar and a Cheat

 

In other now-common news, the President has found it is becoming particularly convenient to ignore, circumvent and forget about laws that are inconvenient.  Ted Cruz reminds us how serious this is becoming.

76 Lawless Actions by Obama

 

Once one gets in the political payoff game, its can get complicated when two of your crony donor groups have opposite desires.  Figuring that green energy gets him more positive press than labor union support – besides, he doesn’t need to work to get the unions – Obama figures radical environmentalism trumps labor.  On top of the Keystone XL dithering, why not contradict the wage jihad political plan when there are big donations to be had?

Between a Labor Rock and a Solar Hard Place

 

One of the standard-issue stereotypes that gets liberals polemically-lathered is the tried and true “McCarthyism” chant.  Forgetting that most liberals don’t have a clue who McCarthy was, they certainly understand the idea of blacklisting.

The Left Embraces Blacklisting

 

Donald Sterling has now entered that descending pit of infamy reserved for the most egregious purveyors of the now worst-possible sin of racial prejudice.  While no one sympathizes with what he said, occasionally a few calmer heads recognize he does indeed have a right to say what he feels.  It is not often that one points to Bill Maher for common sense, but in this case he indeed understands it.

Our Emerging Liberal Dystopia

 

 

Doug Magill is a Communications Consultant, Freelance Writer and Voice-Over talent.  He also a Producer and Co-Host of a radio show on culture and entertainment called The Avenue.  He can be reached at doug@magillmedia.net

 

‘Take Me to Our Leaders’

By J.F. McKenna

Brace yourself. As sure as summer follows spring, the call for leadership always follows the long train of crises. This time will be no different, as the nation surveys a bankrupt City of Detroit, a busted Veterans Administration, a limp economy, a dithering Congress, renegade bureaucrats, the Benghazi “mystery,” an unstable Eastern Europe and a tottering Middle East, a crippling health-care strategy, a worried and skeptical electorate, and so on. As a fellow who watched the Watergate era unfold before an incredulous America, I’ll bet my quite collectable 1978 press card on it. (Yeah, the one with the photo featuring the garish sport coat.)

As columnist George Will recently wrote, too many so-called leaders “have exaggerated government’s proper scope and actual competence, making the public perpetually disappointed and surly.” In turn, we citizens of this so-called constitutional republic have demanded the emergence of real leaders.

Can the demand be satisfied this time round?

To try to answer the question, I sought guidance from the fountainhead of managerial brilliance: the writings of the late Peter Drucker. In the pages of The Wall Street Journal nearly three decades ago, the father of modern management addressed “leadership as work.” Noting that the topic was “all the rage just now,” Drucker first disabused those Journal readers of the notion that leadership is the same as charisma.

Insisting next that performance is the essence of leadership, the business philosopher par excellence stressed the context of leadership, writing that it is “not by itself good or desirable. Leadership is a means. Leadership to what end is thus the crucial question.” To underscore his point, Drucker ticked off a few charismatic leaders who even today inspire malevolent actors on the world stage—Mao, Hitler, Stalin. Call him a name-dropper, if you will; but the good professor knew how to hammer home a point.

Most certainly, Drucker went on, leadership is grounded in “thinking through the organization’s mission, defining it, and establishing it, clearly and visibly. The leader sets goals, sets the priorities, and sets and maintains the standards.”

The leader “makes compromises, of course; indeed, effective leaders are painfully aware that they are not in control of the universe,” wrote Drucker, whose The Effective Executive remains a beloved business classic. “But before accepting a compromise, the effective leader has thought though what is right and desirable. The leader’s first task is to be the trumpet that sounds a clear note.”

To Drucker’s way of thinking, the true leader is the exceptional musician who knows how to create great music, but does not delude himself into thinking that he’s the whole band.

Further, Drucker argued that exceptional leaders—think those in the category of Lincoln or Churchill—understand “leadership as responsibility rather than as rank and privilege,” offering this illustration: “Effective leaders are rarely ‘permissive.’ But when things go wrong—and they always do—they do not blame others….Harry Truman’s folksy ‘The buck stops here’ is still as good a definition as any. ”

Maybe the most telling point for we the disillusioned to take from this Drucker tutorial is that “an effective leader knows that the ultimate task of leadership is to create human energies and human vision.” Better known in my old neighborhood as “all for one and one for all, all the time.”

Which gets me to thinking about a Druckeresque gentleman whom almost any American would like to invite back into a leadership role—if it were possible.

“I never thought it was my style or the words I used that made a difference: It was the content,” Ronald Reagan said in his 1989 farewell, the year after Peter Drucker’s op-ed appeared. “I wasn’t a great communicator, but I communicated great things, and they didn’t spring full bloom from my brow, they came from the heart of a great nation—from our experience, our wisdom, and our belief….”

The next time you hear a discussion about leadership, keep Drucker’s and Reagan’s words in mind. The next time you’re inclined to say “Take me to our leaders,” check the mirror first.

 

J.F. McKenna, a longtime West Park resident, is a veteran business journalist and marketing-communications consultant. He is a former staff editor of such magazines as Industry Week and Northern Ohio Live. His online work also appears on the site Steinbeck Now. A native of Cleveland, he and his wife, Carol, now live in Pittsburgh with their dogs, Duchess Holly and Lord Max. Reach him at jfmckwriter23@yahoo.com .

A Gold Star Family

Rachel Mullen shares a moving story of what it means to be a Gold Star Family:

 

Memorial Day Sacrifices

 

 

 

Democracy Beyond Sloganeering

By J.F. McKenna

Have The Day Big Brother Planned For You.

The bumper sticker initially coaxed a smirk from me as I stopped-started through midday traffic. America, I mused, boasts a limitless supply of satiric epigrams. That highway sentiment would have typically passed through my brain-pan as quickly as it had appeared, but current events have extended the expiration date of the Volvo’s right-lane editorial. Maybe the message is as timely as it is terse.

Only hours before my car ride started, I had read John Stossel’s syndicated lament that quoted Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, an entrepreneur in and out of the sports market. Stossel repeated Cuban’s own lament that he wouldn’t be as successful today because of seemingly limitless government regulation. “Now,” Cuban said, “there’s so much paperwork and regulation, so many things you have to sign up for, that you have a better chance of getting in trouble than you do of being successful.”

Stossel, the cable-TV scold who regularly stumps for free enterprise as vigilantly as any libertarian, didn’t stop there, either. “It’s not just big corporations that get hassled by regulators, the way progressives might like to imagine,” he continued. “Kids’ lemonade stands are sometimes shut down for not having business licenses. When Chloe Stirling was 11 years old, health officials shut down her home cupcake-making business.”

Cupcake-making regulations for11 year olds? Not exactly in keeping with the spirit of what Publius, aka Alexander Hamilton, wrote in The Federalist No. 22: “The fabric of American Empire ought to rest on the solid basis of THE CONSENT OF PEOPLE. The streams of national power ought to flow immediately from the pure original fountain of all legitimate authority.”

Too damned-bad that Volvo can’t accommodate such a long and weighty sentiment on its bumper, no? Sure, we’d have to cut speed limits considerably to increase reading time —and I guess that’s just not going to happen in our age of Twitter and $3.75-a-gallon gasoline.

So allow me to offer an additional message suitable for the back of the car: If Thought Corrupts Language, Language Can Also Corrupt Thought.

In addition to being brief enough for safe on-road consumption, it has a direct pedigree with the Volvo’s current message: The line is from George Orwell’s 1946 essay “Politics and the English Language.” That’s right, the same George Orwell who gave us the original Big Brother in the dystopian fictional classic, 1984.

More important, it’s an especially timely message as America’s discontent grows with ginned-up economic stats about our actually anemic economy, IRS shenanigans with citizens’ privacy, and growing questions about the Obama administration’s handling of the deadly jihadist attack on Americans in Benghazi in 2012. Most of us plain-speaking Yankees are starting to really see through the “most transparent administration” in our history.

“In the case of a word like democracy,” Orwell writes, “not only is there no agreed definition, but the attempt to make one is resisted from all sides. It is almost universally felt that when we call a country democratic we are praising it: consequently the defenders of every kind of regime claim that it is a democracy, and fear that they might have to stop using the word if it were tied down to any one meaning. Words of this kind are often used in a consciously dishonest way. That is, the person who uses them has his own private definition, but allows his hearer to think he means something quite different.”

At the essay’s conclusion Orwell declares that “political speech and writing are largely the defense of the indefensible,” but nonetheless holds out the belief that “the decadence of our language is probably curable.” And that such rehabilitation can beget democracy agreed on by all.

That, of course, will take more than just a slogan on a bumper.

 

J.F. McKenna, a longtime West Park resident, is a veteran business journalist and marketing-communications consultant. He is a former staff editor of such magazines as Industry Week and Northern Ohio Live. His online work also appears on the site Steinbeck Now. A native of Cleveland, he and his wife, Carol, now live in Pittsburgh with their dogs, Duchess Holly and Lord Max. Reach him at jfmckwriter23@yahoo.com .

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